Search
Search Menu

Login

This site is available only to JEA members. Please log in below.


Lesson: Assigning Job Descriptions to Leadership

 

Description

After picking the leaders for next year, then what? Picking the fearless leaders is only part of the battle to planning next year. Who does what job? Does everyone know who is doing what, and is it specific? Having clear expectations is important from the top down so everyone knows who to speak with for questions and work submission. Should the adviser allow the people to fit the jobs or the jobs to fit the people? Since each year is a re-building year in scholastic media, creating jobs around the people an adviser has will help take the stress out of leadership structure and allow everyone to flourish.

By the end of this lesson, all leaders should have individual job descriptions with day-to-day duties for which they are responsible.

 

Summary

Leaders will work independently by reflecting on their media experience. They will write down their biggest strength, biggest weakness and what are they most proud of. Then leaders will discuss these bullet points together as a group to better understand one another. Leaders will then create a list of jobs they see any leader executing, ensuring they exhaust all avenues of what needs to be done and that no job is ignored. Once the list is created, leaders will assign jobs to each other based on their strengths, weaknesses and goals.

This lesson can be done by itself or, for better results, done after the Personality Types and Media Staff Goal Setting lessons.

 

Objectives

  • Students will reflect on their strengths and weaknesses as they pertain to their experience on media staff.
  • Students will interpret their personality and evaluate how these characteristics will affect them as a leader.
  • Students will participate in a presentation/discussion regarding their strengths and weaknesses as they pertain to their experience on media staff.
  • Students will create a list of job descriptions for leadership.
  • Leadership team will disseminate all the information to decipher who will be in charge of what as part of their leadership duties for the year.

 

Common Core Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1d Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

 

Materials

Paper and pen

A method to brainstorm as a group: poster board or dry erase board and markers, chalkboard, projector hooked up to laptop are all good ideas

Job Descriptions Sample 1

Job Descriptions Sample 2

 

Lesson step-by-step

1. Reflection Activity (independent work) — 15 minutes

On a sheet of paper, leaders will work independently by reflecting on their media experience.

They need to write down their biggest strength, biggest weakness and what are they most proud of. The group can expand the list for bigger staffs/leadership groups to multiple strengths, weaknesses and what they are proud of.

If the group has not done goal setting, this may be a good time to talk about what they want to do to improve both individually and as a group.

 

2. Discuss Reflection (group work) — 10-20 minutes (depending on group size)

Leaders will discuss bullet points together as a group to better understand one another.

 

3. Brainstorm Leadership Duties (group work) — 15-45 minutes (depending on group size)

Leaders will create a list of jobs they see any leader executing, ensuring they exhaust all avenues of what needs to be done with no job ignored. This can open up conversations about what went well last year and what needs improvement. Work through those procedural items and add any new items to the job duty list.

 

4. Divvy up responsibilities and discuss — 15-45 minutes (depending on group size)

Once the list has been gathered, assign job duties based on strengths. Also give each leadership member a challenge so they improve.

If the leader is more of an introvert, they may want to allow them “leading the group” as their challenge. If the leader is more of an extrovert, they may need a different type of challenge. For example, if a leader admits their weakness is organization, maybe they have a secondary responsibility with something to keep organized.

Do not appoint a primary duty to someone who would be weak in that area. For example, if there is a leader that confesses they are not good at photography, it wouldn’t be smart to make them a photo editor because of the problem that will create. Maybe they take on a secondary task like the photography calendar because they are organized. So they are getting better at something, but not setup for failure.

Allow everyone to have a say in something they want to do to invigorate the group. There will be tasks that people have to take on because they are left over, but someone has to take on the “chores.” If those jobs are dispersed equally, everyone usually feels a sense of responsibility and are empowered by that.

 

5. Typing up the job descriptions — 30 minutes (assigned to one leader to do or the adviser may want to do it)

Figure out a way to bullet point the job descriptions list and configure the design to fit on one page. Post this in the room so everyone can access it regularly. (See samples.)