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Lesson: Distributing a Product

Title

Distributing a Product

Description

Students will participate in a discussion about distributing various products and then complete two assignments to consider the event planning process and addressing audience complaints and feedback, as well as corrections and Letters to the Editor

Objectives

  • Students will explain issues about the distribution process, including getting the media product out to the audience efficiently, providing opportunities for the audience to respond and give feedback, making corrections, responding to criticism and working with a school administration to limit the disruption to the school environment.
  • Students will brainstorm possible problems and solutions to different aspects of the distribution process.
  • Students will respond to hypothetical distribution scenarios about addressing audience complaints and feedback, corrections and Letters to the Editor, keeping in mind appropriate public relations techniques.
  • Students will develop a hypothetical distribution process for a media product of their choice or their teacher’s choice, depending on teacher preference, keeping in mind a means of getting the word out to their audience, while taking into account possible school restrictions on their activities and the means for allowing the audience to make their views known in a reasonably open and flexible, yet structured, environment.

Common Core State Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2b Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2c Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2e Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1b Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1d Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

Partnership for 21st Century Skills — Student Outcomes

Skills P21 outcomes
Creativity and Innovation Think creatively
Creativity and Innovation Work creatively with others
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Reason effectively
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Make judgments and decisions
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Solve problems
Communication and Collaboration Collaborate with others
Media Literacy Analyze media

Length

12 Weeks: 120-140 minutes (two 60-70 minute classes)

6 Weeks and 4 Weeks: 60-70 minutes (one class); assign either the Addressing Audience Feedback or Planning a Distribution Process assignment

Materials

Handout: Addressing Audience Feedback

Slideshow: Distribution Slideshow

Handout: Distribution Slideshow Notes

Handout: Planning a Distribution Process Assignment

Lesson step-by-step

Day 1

1. Warm Up — 20 minutes

Distribute the Warm Up: Distribution handout. Guide students through analysis of each photo of Whitney High School’s yearbook distribution planning and event, using the PowerPoint Distribution Slideshow.

2. Handout distribution — 3 minutes

Distribute the brainstorming/notes pages.

2. Brainstorming — 15 minutes

Guide students through the brainstorming activity as they consider various aspects of the distribution process, including planning, getting the media product out to the audience efficiently, providing opportunities for the audience to respond and give feedback, making corrections, responding to criticism and working with a school administration to limit the disruption to the school environment.

3. Slideshow — 20 minutes

Supplement the brainstorming activity with a brief period of notes from the Distribution Slideshow, spending more time on the areas in which students appeared to have fewer ideas during the brainstorming process.

4. Work time — 10-20 minutes

Distribute the Addressing Audience Feedback Assignment and give students until the end of the class period to complete it. Based on available time, consider leaving time at the end of class to discuss student ideas. In either case, be available to address student confusion, concerns, or questions that arise during the period. Students should finish the assignment for homework if it is not completed by the end of class.

Day 2

1. Homework/class work review — 10-15 minutes

Review the Addressing Audience Feedback Assignment from Day 1, based on student work and discussion from Day 1, especially if students had fewer ideas about these areas during the brainstorming activity at the beginning of class. Before moving on to the Planning a Distribution Process Assignment, make sure all students appear to have a solid understanding of the importance of addressing audience feedback, concerns and complaints as an important means of continuing the discussion with the audience..

2. Review assignment — 5 minutes

Distribute the Planning a Distribution Process Assignment and go over the instructions with students, either telling them which type of publication they should focus on or allowing them to select the publication they would like to consider for their process.

3. Work time — remainder of the class

Give students the rest of the class period to complete the assignment, being available to address student confusion, concerns or questions that arise during the period. Students should finish the assignment for homework if it is not completed by the end of class.