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Lesson: Self-Evaluating — When is my Beat Ready for Submission?

Title

Self-Evaluating – When is my Beat Ready for Submission?

Description

As each writer will submit beats for publication, students will learn how to determine when they have met all the criteria for a beat, and they will understand criteria that they will be assessed on (a.k.a. “How do I get an A on this?”).

Objectives

  • Students will understand how to self-assess their work
  • Students will identify what elements should be included in a beat
  • Students will submit a handout that demonstrates their understanding of the criteria.

Common Core State Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

Length

One 50 minute class period, plus attendance at an event for a beat coverage

Materials / resources

Slideshow: Beat Writer Expectations

Handout: Beat Evaluation Reflection

Rubric: Self-Evaluation

Lesson step-by-step

1. Introduction — 5 minutes

Explain that students are responsible for the content they submit, and that what they publish will not be seen by a teacher or adviser before it is sent up online. As a result, students need to have a clear understanding of what is expected in their submissions.

2. Discussion/review — 20 minutes
(optional – hand out the “Beat Evaluation handout so students can follow along during the presentation)

Review the slides in the presentation “Beat Writer Expectations”, pausing for discussion as indicated.

(using a think-pair-share with equity cards is an effective way to lead these discussions).

3. Review a peer’s story — 20 minutes (complete for homework)
Give students the “Beat Evaluation Reflection” handout to use as they assess a peer’s already published work.

(As an alternative, have students use rough drafts of their first unpublished beats and let them revise based upon the feedback).

Day 2 – Reflection and follow-up

1. Introduction — 10 minutes

Have students exchange their peer editing sheets with the original writer and allow them to review the feedback.

2. Discussion — 10 minutes

Lead students in a discussion of the following:

(using a think-pair-share with equity cards is an effective way to lead these discussions).

  • Why is it important to know this as a writer for the web?
  • How does this make you a better writer?
  • What is the one most important thing you learned from this lesson?

3. Reflection — 25 minutes

Have students write a one-two paragraph reflection of what they learned and how they will apply it to their own writing in future lessons. Attach that to the peer review sheet that was completed. Once the peer editing is complete, have students submit that document to the teacher to assess whether they understand the criteria using the rubric.

Differentiation

Students can use the reflection handout as part of their own beat-writing process

As an alternative, have students use rough drafts of their first unpublished beats and let them revise based upon the feedback.

Depending on students’ skill level and available technology, they can work alone or in groups to complete the activity.